Jean Gildas Tapsoba

As a young water professional, I want to grab this opportunity to develop myself, gain adequate skills, and use them to make a positive impact in vulnerable communities in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in Burkina Faso.

Sub-Saharan Africa
Burkina Faso Sub-Saharan Africa

Jean Gildas Tapsoba, from Burkina Faso, is studying for a Master’s in Water Management and Governance.

How did you hear about IHE Delft?
I was looking for reputable institutions specialized in the water sector. Through my professional network lecturers and social media networks, I discovered IHE Delft Institute for Water Education.  

What are the benefits of studying here?
My choice for IHE Delft was determined by the numerous benefits: I was confident that IHE Delft will provide a stimulating learning environment that will enable me to think critically about my career and to learn new skills that will contribute to tackling water-related issues worldwide. Additionally, IHE Delft is prestigious and well-known for its expertise in the water sector, and studying at this Institute is a life-changing opportunity. I will have the privilege to learn more about myself and extend my professional international network.

Why did you choose to study in the field of water?
My interest in the water-related field started in 2014, during my undergraduate studies in Water and Environmental engineering. Water sciences and related fields are areas of interest to me because of their emerging nature in most developing countries. I got the opportunity to travel to rural areas in West and East Africa, where water resource management and allocation remain a challenge for the National Water Authorities. The Water Management and Governance program will enable me to develop a better understanding of the issues and the skills to contribute to solutions. 

Water-related problems in Burkina Faso
In Burkina Faso, providing water to all citizens remains a challenge. It has been estimated that more than 75% of the population have access to safe drinking water and about 34% of the population have access to adequate sanitary facilities. However, drinking water is being contaminated during transportation and storage. Poor water quality causes water-related diseases such as diarrheal diseases and deficiency disorders in 60% of the population. These are important public health concerns.

In the Sahel region of Burkina Faso, the scarcity of water resources is worsened by increased insecurity. Today, more and more communities in the region are forced to leave their villages and seek refuge in more secure villages. This displacement of people increases pressure on available resources and make those communities more vulnerable than the rest of the country. There is an urgent need to restructure the water sector and to develop an inclusive sanitation chain to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6 by 2030.  

My first week and student experience
So far, the experience has been very positive and I strongly recommend it. I was impressed to witness  this institution’s network of experts involved in teaching, the various projects conducted worldwide, and the diversity among staff and students. It is the first time I am in such a huge international environment with students and lecturers coming from various countries all over the world. It was impressive. The teaching and learning process are things I have been enjoying. Lecturers try as much as possible to break the gap by pushing us to go out of our comfort zones and deal with diversity. There are several group assignments and activities that are designed to help us work together and achieve our goals.  

After graduation 
As a young water professional, I want to grab this opportunity to develop myself, gain adequate skills, and use them to make a positive impact in vulnerable communities in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in Burkina Faso. 

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